Identifying trafficking victims is just the start of health care's challenge

Dr. Hanni Stoklosa speaks with a patient.  - Courtesy: Michelle Cerulli

Dr. Hanni Stoklosa speaks with a patient.  - Courtesy: Michelle Cerulli

Part 3 of 3
There are people living and working in the United States who are forced to work or to sell their bodies for someone else’s profit.

It can be difficult to help the victims of human trafficking — they’re hard to find.

But one place a lot of them show up is in a health care setting.

As many as 68 percent of people who are trafficked end up in a clinic, an ER or the doctor's office at some point while being exploited.

In just the last two years, federal officials have begun funding efforts to train front-line providers to see signs of trafficking among their patients.

It’s slow going. There are 5,686 hospitals in the United States, and 60 of them have a plan in place if someone who is being trafficked walks through the door.

To read more: http://www.marketplace.org/2016/03/04/health-care/identifying-trafficking-victims-just-start-health-cares-challenge